Many new dog owners frequently try to determine what is the appropriate length of an Australian Labradoodle puppy’s nails. A good guideline is that if you can hear your Labradoodle dog’s nails strike the floor, they’re too long. People often wonder what is the big deal about Labradoodle nail length?

Many Labradoodle breeders will tell you that long toenails can lead to painful feet and posture abnormalities that can result in muscle aches and pain. They can lead to increased pressure on the joints and force the toe to twist sideways. It is helpful to know that there are many Labradoodle dog breeds. Often the nails of non-allergenic puppies’ grow quite fast, especially Australian Labradoodles in Texas. Although we could talk about trimming dog nails for a long time, following are the finer points of the task:

As a Labradoodle dog owner, it is imperative that nail trimming becomes part of your hypoallergenic Australian Labradoodle puppy grooming routine. It is important to start trimming your doodle puppy’s nails at a young age as most dogs dislike the process. Early exposure to nail trimming will help your Australian Labradoodle puppy get used to the process and allow you to trim his nails without attempting to escape.

  1. Labradoodle puppy/dog placement: There are three usual positions to trim your dog’s nails. You can sit your puppy in your lap, both of you facing the same direction, you can have him lay down with his paws up or you can stand your dog on a table and lift each paw up as you’re working on it. I recommend that you try each one and figure out which is most comfortable for you and your pet.
  2. Proper equipment: Regardless of type, any new tools may require a period of adjustment. A beginner may find the scissor-type or plier-style clippers little easier to use than other types. As you become more comfortable trimming your Australian doodle’s nails, you may find that the guillotine-type trimmer is the easiest to use. If you want to use a nail grinder, you may need some practice attempts with your Labradoodle puppy to help him adjust to the vibration of the tool. What is the bottom line on equipment? Use whatever you and your nonshedding dog are the most comfortable with! Just remember, the sharper the trimmer, the cleaner the cut.

    image from https://www.vetbabble.com

  3. Angle: Contrary to popular beliefs, there are three cuts that should be done.  The initial cut takes off the tip of the nail and that cut is done at 45 degrees (diagram 1) or 90 degrees (diagram 2). Cut two and three should be done on either side of the nail (diagram 2).

    image from https://www.dogcareworld.net

    Lighter colored Hypogenic Australian Labradoodles like caramel Labradoodles, apricot Labradoodles, cream Labradoodles, chalk Labradoodles, and tan Labradoodles may have light-colored nails, which are easier to cut than dark ones from chocolate and black Labradoodles as the nail anatomy is easier to see. Clear nails can usually be trimmed with just three cuts. Trim dark nails in several smaller cuts to reduce the chance of cutting too much and causing the nail bleed.

    image from https://www.vetmed.wsu.edu

  4. Making the cut and when to stop: Keep trimming the nail until you see the pulp. But, remember, it is always better to take your time and cut a little bit at a time rather than to cut too much too fast. When dealing with dark nails where you can’t see the pulp, it can be difficult to tell how much to cut and where to stop. In situations like that, look at the tip of the nail where you just made the cut. The dead tissue that should be trimmed further will usually appear whitish but as you cut deeper, you will begin to see a dark area (the pulp). You can try another tiny cut, but if you’re afraid of cutting too much or your Labradoodle puppy suddenly wants to get away from you, you should probably stop trimming that nail.

    image from https://devoteddogworld.com

    When you see the dark center of the nail, stop trimming or you will make your Australian Labradoodle puppy bleed. Trimming your Doodle puppy’s nails is one way to ensure that the pulp does not continue to grow and prevent any long-term musculoskeletal changes.

    image from https://devoteddogworld.com

  5. Nail trimming frequency: Ideally, nonallergenic puppy’s nails should be trimmed every 1-2 weeks. It seems like a lot but there is an upside to the task. Do you want to know what it is? It’s simple! You don’t have to worry about cutting the nails super short. However, trimming your Labradoodle’s nails at regular intervals helps to keep your puppy healthy and active. Also, by trying to get as close to the pulp as possible (without causing an injury by trimming too much) encourages the pulp to recede! Remember, as with most grooming tasks, rewarding your pet for positive behavior is an important part of your Australian Labradoodle puppy’s acceptance of the activity.

    Tip: Afraid of trimming too much and injuring your Australian Labradoodle puppy? Try using Quick Finder Safety Nail Trimmer. It has a built-in QuickSensor technology that detects the pulp of your Australian Labradoodle’s nails and alerts you that you’re too close before you make the cut.
    Tip: Have you cut too much? No one is perfect, and accidents do happen. So, before you trim your Labradoodle’s nails, make sure that you have the styptic powder to stop the blood flow. If a nail does bleed, apply a pinch of the yellow powder to the bleeding nail and some pressure to the tip of the nail and the bleeding will subside pretty fast. However, even without any treatment, the nail should stop bleeding in about 5 minutes or less. Remember, the more you practice the better you will get!